How I Won Every Street Fight in My Life (Without Breaking a Sweat) | KARATE by Jesse

How I Won Every Street Fight in My Life (Without Breaking a Sweat)

By Jesse Enkamp

Listen…

Would you believe me if I told you I’ve won 100% of the street fights in my life?

It’s true.

This might sound weird – I know what you’re thinking:

“OH MY FREAKING GOSH! I didn’t know Jesse-san was a vicious street fighter! “

Chill out!

You’re right.

How I Won Every Street Fight in My Life (Without Breaking a Sweat) | KARATE by Jesse.

 

 

5 Tips for Running With a Jogging Stroller

Running with an extra fifty-plus pounds isn’t easy. Here’s how to fix some of the most common mistakes.

Every time I see a parent running with a stroller, I send them a mental high five. It takes willpower to work out with kids, and I commend anyone who chooses to push an extra fifty-some pounds while doing it.

 

It’s also easy to slip into bad form while running – let alone walking – with a stroller. So, here’s a guide on how to run with a stroller in a way that maximizes efficiency and minimizes injury risk.

 

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Why Every Man Needs a Challenge

Editor’s note: This is a guest post from author and Navy SEAL Eric Greitens. My boxing coach Earl used to say, “You can’t get better fighting someone who’s worse than you.” That was cold comfort after my training partner, Derrick, had cracked me in the mouth with a jab. But I knew that Earl was […]


from The Art of Manliness http://ift.tt/1x6J4f0

Chuck Norris turns 75: How the martial arts movie star became a cult legend in … – Irish Independent


Irish Independent

Chuck Norris turns 75: How the martial arts movie star became a cult legend in
Irish Independent
Martial arts. After serving in the United States Air Force, Norris rose to fame as a martial artist. He was a six-time undefeated World Professional Middle Weight Karate Champion. In 1997 he became the first man from the western hemisphere to be
Every Unforgettable Chuck Norris Kick In Honor Of The Actor’s 75th Birthday
Chuck Norris Turns 75: 5 Fascinating Scoops About The Legendary Actor’s Life
Happy 75th birthday, Chuck Norris!
 –

from martial arts -mixed – Google News http://ift.tt/1Lw4bOa

How Do Martial Artists Break Concrete Blocks? – Slate Magazine (blog)


Slate Magazine (blog)

How Do Martial Artists Break Concrete Blocks?
Slate Magazine (blog)
The blow from the martial artist creates bending stresses in the block. From material science we know that when subjected to bending stress, an unreinforced concrete block of this thickness has very low strength. The observable behavior will be a

from martial arts -mixed – Google News http://ift.tt/19wHrwX

How to Stay Motivated in Your Martial Arts and Fitness Training

“Real difficulties can be overcome; it is only the imaginary ones that are unconquerable.”

— Theodore N. Vail

Using half his speed, the coach threw a jab at the student’s face. Without flinching, the student parried the punch. “Good!” the coach said. “Let’s try again. I’m going to pick up the pace a little.”

The student smiled and nodded confidently. The coach threw a jab at three-quarters speed, but this time, the student wasn’t fast enough. The coach pulled the punch, his fist just barely touching the student’s face.

The coach frowned. “OK, let’s do it again,” he said. “Remember that I’m going to do it faster. Try to react quicker.” The student smiled, again with confidence, but the coach ended up having to pull his punch.

“I guess I can’t go any faster,” the student said apologetically.

“STAY IN THE FIGHT: A MARTIAL ATHLETE’S GUIDE TO PREVENTING AND OVERCOMING INJURY” — THIS BOOK BY DANNY DRING AND JOHNNY D. TAYLOR IS ON SALE NOW!

The coach proceeded to throw the punch at one-quarter speed, but the student barely managed to parry it. “One more,” the coach said. This time, the blow was even slower, and again the student barely managed to block it.

The student shrugged his shoulders. “I’m just not that fast, I guess,” he said sheepishly.

“Wait,” the coach said. The student wondered, Wait for what?

Without emotion, the coach walked to the gear locker and slipped on a pair of boxing gloves. He approached the student and threw several fast punches. The student’s smile faded.

“OK, we’ll do it again,” the coach said.

“But why are you — what are the gloves for?” the student asked.

“So you don’t get hurt too badly if a punch gets through,” the coach replied nonchalantly. “I’m not going to hold back. I’m going to hit you in the head.”

“POWER TRAINING FOR THE MARTIAL ARTS,” AN INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEO BY LEO FONG, IS AVAILABLE FOR IMMEDIATE DOWNLOAD — OR AS A CONVENTIONAL DVD.

The student’s eyes bulged, but before he could say another word, a punch flashed at him half speed. The student blocked the strike with ease. “Again!” the coach ordered as he threw several more strikes in rapid succession. The wide-eyed young man blocked each one.

“Again!” This time, the punches were almost full speed, but the student blocked each one even though his technique was a little sloppy. Nevertheless, his movements had developed a new vitality. There was energy and spirit in each parry.

The coach stopped, stepped back and grinned. “OK, that’s enough for now,” he said.

Somewhat bewildered, the student returned the grin and stared at his coach’s back while he walked away. He couldn’t see the smile forming on his coach’s face.

***

Morne Swanepoel

I’ve been training since 1976. The martial arts have been my profession and way of life since the early 1990s. During that time, I’ve often been asked how a person can stay motivated. How does a student get up every morning and jump into his or her training routine? How does a practitioner avoid becoming part of the majority, the people who give up before reaching their goal?

“Difficulties should act as a tonic. They should spur us to greater exertion.” — B.C. Forbes

If someone asks me what a martial artist ought to devote the most time to, I always say training. Train more than you sleep. I attribute my ability to keep on training, decade after decade, to Mister Mo.

Mister Mo is motivation. Mister Mo means no retreat, no surrender — no retreat from hard work, no surrender to laziness or sloppy form.

Mister Mo should be the most important person in your life, even more so than your teacher or your classmates. It’s good to have an end to journey toward, but it’s the journey that matters in the end.

“THE MARTIAL ARTS/KETTLEBELL CONNECTION,” BY JOHN SPEZZANO, WILL POWER UP YOUR MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING. GET IT HERE.

Mister Mo is the one who urges you to attend class when you’d rather stay home and watch television. He’s inside you when you do the extra kick, punch or takedown. He wipes the sweat from your eyes so you can crank out a dozen more reps of that technique that’s been so difficult. He keeps you training month after month, year after year. He drives you to face your physical and mental limitations. He forces you to confront laziness, failures and the fear of success. He makes you walk the endless path of the martial arts. He encourages you to push yourself to your limit and beyond. He helps you tune out the pain as you drive yourself to victory over yourself.

“A desire can overcome all objections and obstacles.” — Gunderson

Teachers can open the door, but you must enter by yourself. Avoiding pain might be the biggest motivational factor there is. Doing a proper technique to avoid a broken nose is an example of external motivation. Most people who train in the martial arts do so, at least initially, because they want to learn self-defense. They don’t want to get hurt if they’re attacked. For those who enjoy the sport aspects of the arts, external motivation may be the next tournament trophy. For some, it’s the next belt. A student will sometimes quit after reaching a particular rank. The belt was the goal. Once it’s earned, the student no longer has motivation. Mister Mo leaves the building.

Unlike external motivation, internal motivation is a more difficult concept to understand. Internal motivation is the desire to excel for the sake of pursuing excellence. Internal motivation means you’re competing against yourself, not others. It means you want to do as well as you can, regardless of how others do. Internally motivated students tend to persist in their training. While they’re satisfied with each promotion, they’re driven to succeed beyond rank or trophies. They train because they want to improve, not because they want to impress others. If you cannot find the truth right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?

***

How can you stay motivated day in and day out?

•          Search for that drive to succeed.

•          Become mentally motivated. Mister Mo is in all of us. You can call on him at any time when things get tough.

•          Don’t worry what others are doing. If you’re trying to surpass someone else, you’re limited to what that person has done. You must have no limits. Always strive for excellence.

•          Set more challenging goals and record them in a journal or diary. Pick a time to review your goals and evaluate your progress. Then set new goals.

•          Focus on your growth and development as a martial artist and as a person. Learn joyfully, then share joyfully. Daily improvement in every aspect of your life is the overall aim. Don’t just think positive; act positive.

•          Be yourself, but be the best of yourself. And when you feel discouraged, don’t be afraid to call on Mister Mo.

Morné Swanepoel is a South Africa-based martial arts teacher, MMA coach and fitness instructor. For more information, visit CombatCoaching.com.

from Robert W. Young
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Wisdom of the Martial Arts: Advice for the Dojo, Advice for Life!

For cerebral students of self-defense, a favorite facet of the fighting arts is the accumulated wisdom that’s conveyed in class, in books, in magazines and on television.

These comments and observations tend to sum up much broader concepts, putting them in bite-size chunks anyone can digest. The following are a few faves from some martial artists you know, as well as some martial artists you probably haven’t heard of.

Mas Oyama

Karate is not my hobby. It is my life.”

— Mas Oyama, founder of kyokushin, from the Summer 1963 issue of Black Belt

GET YOUR FREE GUIDE NOW! IT’S TITLED “HISTORY OF KARATE: INSIDE MAS OYAMA’S HARD-CORE KYOKUSHIN KARATE CONDITIONING PROGRAM.”

***

“As instructors, we’re teaching children and young adults to respect others and their elders. We focus on discipline and doing the right thing, not just how to injure someone.”

— G.K. Lee, chief master of the American Taekwondo Association

***

“Karate, as a method of combat, isn’t a bag of tricks or specific responses; it’s a series of principles, physically enacted, that allow for a freedom to implement a wide range of responses that are spontaneous.”

— Dave Lowry, Black Belt contributing editor

***

Bong Soo Han

“Without the philosophy and spirituality, martial arts become meaningless and just a dangerous sport.”

— Bong Soo Han, hapkido pioneer

“BILLY JACK FLASHBACK: HOW TOM LAUGHLIN AND HAPKIDO TECHNIQUES MASTER BONG SOO HAN MADE A MARTIAL ARTS CULT CLASSIC” IS THE TITLE OF A FREE GUIDE YOU CAN DOWNLOAD RIGHT NOW!

***

“Gain ground with every punch, kick and block. You don’t train to fight one way and then perform kata another. Your kata should support your fighting; all your movement should support the hit. You’re only as good as your ability to hit.”

Gary Alexander, isshin-ryu karate

***

“The development of physical attributes, psychological conditioning and legal knowledge for the purpose of personal protection. The goal is to escape physical harm and protect loved ones by using whatever means are necessary within the boundaries of the law.”

Kelly S. Worden, when asked to define self-defense

***

Ed Parker

“What is true for one person may not be true for another. The real truth for both lies in the moment of actual combat.”

— Ed Parker, American kenpo pioneer, as reported in Black Belt, 1979

***

“Each instructor is naturally biased toward his own style. Each will naturally say his style is superior. As has been said so many times before, however, an instructor is only as good as the students he turns out.”

Chuck Norris, writing for Black Belt

***

“Success boils down to having a reflexive response to an attack.”

William Cheung, wing chun kung fu master

GO HERE TO BUY WILLIAM CHEUNG’S WING CHUN BOOKS AND DVDS.

***

Jigoro Kano

“There are two types of judo. Small judo is concerned with only techniques and the building of the body. Large judo is mindful of the pursuit of the purpose of life: the soul and the body used in the most effective manner for a good result.”

— Jigoro Kano, Black Belt, February 1971

***

“Without balance, there’s no control.”

— Gary Alexander, isshin-ryu karate

***

“The ability to free-spar or fight well is the result of training and should not be the primary means of training.”

— Robin Rielly, sixth-degree black belt in shotokan

***

Mas Oyama

“The best reason for learning karate is to develop character — to make a good man first and a strong man second. This must be understood to advance.”

— Mas Oyama, Black Belt, Summer 1963 issue

***

“Force your opponent to make his body rigid and lose his balance, and then when he is helpless, you attack.”

— Jigoro Kano, Black Belt, February 1970

“THE NEIL ADAMS GUIDE TO JUDO THROWS” — GET THIS FREE GUIDE BY A JUDO LEGEND NOW!

***

“During free training, beginners will usually practice the last thing they were taught while advanced karateka will spend time working on what they learned first.”

Dave Lowry, Black Belt contributing editor

ORDER “BOKKEN: ART OF THE JAPANESE SWORD,” BY DAVE LOWRY, HERE.

***

“It is said that a man’s weapon was the sword and a woman’s was the fan, and the fan did more damage.”

Rick Steves in his self-titled travel documentary series, talking about England in the 1600s, a period when the fan was a tool for flirting.

from Robert W. Young
Read more

Wisdom of the Martial Arts: Advice for the Dojo, Advice for Life!

For cerebral students of self-defense, a favorite facet of the fighting arts is the accumulated wisdom that’s conveyed in class, in books, in magazines and on television.

These comments and observations tend to sum up much broader concepts, putting them in bite-size chunks anyone can digest. The following are a few faves from some martial artists you know, as well as some martial artists you probably haven’t heard of.

Mas Oyama

Karate is not my hobby. It is my life.”

— Mas Oyama, founder of kyokushin, from the Summer 1963 issue of Black Belt

GET YOUR FREE GUIDE NOW! IT’S TITLED “HISTORY OF KARATE: INSIDE MAS OYAMA’S HARD-CORE KYOKUSHIN KARATE CONDITIONING PROGRAM.”

***

“As instructors, we’re teaching children and young adults to respect others and their elders. We focus on discipline and doing the right thing, not just how to injure someone.”

— G.K. Lee, chief master of the American Taekwondo Association

***

“Karate, as a method of combat, isn’t a bag of tricks or specific responses; it’s a series of principles, physically enacted, that allow for a freedom to implement a wide range of responses that are spontaneous.”

— Dave Lowry, Black Belt contributing editor

***

Bong Soo Han

“Without the philosophy and spirituality, martial arts become meaningless and just a dangerous sport.”

— Bong Soo Han, hapkido pioneer

“BILLY JACK FLASHBACK: HOW TOM LAUGHLIN AND HAPKIDO TECHNIQUES MASTER BONG SOO HAN MADE A MARTIAL ARTS CULT CLASSIC” IS THE TITLE OF A FREE GUIDE YOU CAN DOWNLOAD RIGHT NOW!

***

“Gain ground with every punch, kick and block. You don’t train to fight one way and then perform kata another. Your kata should support your fighting; all your movement should support the hit. You’re only as good as your ability to hit.”

Gary Alexander, isshin-ryu karate

***

“The development of physical attributes, psychological conditioning and legal knowledge for the purpose of personal protection. The goal is to escape physical harm and protect loved ones by using whatever means are necessary within the boundaries of the law.”

Kelly S. Worden, when asked to define self-defense

***

Ed Parker

“What is true for one person may not be true for another. The real truth for both lies in the moment of actual combat.”

— Ed Parker, American kenpo pioneer, as reported in Black Belt, 1979

***

“Each instructor is naturally biased toward his own style. Each will naturally say his style is superior. As has been said so many times before, however, an instructor is only as good as the students he turns out.”

Chuck Norris, writing for Black Belt

***

“Success boils down to having a reflexive response to an attack.”

William Cheung, wing chun kung fu master

GO HERE TO BUY WILLIAM CHEUNG’S WING CHUN BOOKS AND DVDS.

***

Jigoro Kano

“There are two types of judo. Small judo is concerned with only techniques and the building of the body. Large judo is mindful of the pursuit of the purpose of life: the soul and the body used in the most effective manner for a good result.”

— Jigoro Kano, Black Belt, February 1971

***

“Without balance, there’s no control.”

— Gary Alexander, isshin-ryu karate

***

“The ability to free-spar or fight well is the result of training and should not be the primary means of training.”

— Robin Rielly, sixth-degree black belt in shotokan

***

Mas Oyama

“The best reason for learning karate is to develop character — to make a good man first and a strong man second. This must be understood to advance.”

— Mas Oyama, Black Belt, Summer 1963 issue

***

“Force your opponent to make his body rigid and lose his balance, and then when he is helpless, you attack.”

— Jigoro Kano, Black Belt, February 1970

“THE NEIL ADAMS GUIDE TO JUDO THROWS” — GET THIS FREE GUIDE BY A JUDO LEGEND NOW!

***

“During free training, beginners will usually practice the last thing they were taught while advanced karateka will spend time working on what they learned first.”

Dave Lowry, Black Belt contributing editor

ORDER “BOKKEN: ART OF THE JAPANESE SWORD,” BY DAVE LOWRY, HERE.

***

“It is said that a man’s weapon was the sword and a woman’s was the fan, and the fan did more damage.”

Rick Steves in his self-titled travel documentary series, talking about England in the 1600s, a period when the fan was a tool for flirting.

from Robert W. Young
Read more